“Freedom Checks”: Better Than Dividends

Investors who took a chance and believed in Matt Badiali’s “Freedom Checks” may just be having a large payday coming real soon. Matt Badiali is a financial advisor who added more recognition to his name by discovering “Freedom Checks” and sharing this investment opportunity with the rest of the world. He believes that there will be over $34.6 billion worth of these checks given out to shareholders with the guts to act. Many people thought this investment opportunity was a government program and the ad with Matt Badiali holding a substantial check may have confused people because it looked like a government-issued check. This secret is not part of a government-sponsored program, but it has the potential to provide shareholders with a reliable tax-free income stream for many years to come.

Matt Badiali traveled to many countries as a geologist inspecting mines and oil wells. He learned from many financial advisors and oil professionals. His training taught him to examine an investment firsthand before choosing to invest. He was learning about natural resource stocks when he discovered “Master Limited Partnerships”. He learned that MLPs pay Freedom Checks to their shareholders. MLPs differ from most companies in that the government allows them to stay in business without having to pay federal income taxes. They must pay their shareholders at least ninety percent of their profits. Therefore, their distributions for shareholders tend to be substantial. Shareholders are not required to pay taxes on the “Freedom Checks” they receive and only pay a capital gains tax when they sell their shares.

Many investors want to know the secret to getting started with MLPs. The process involves the investor to have a brokerage account and a small starting capital. An investor then checks out the MLPs they wish to invest in. There are currently over five hundred companies that meet the requirements to be an MLP. Once an investor buys the shares, they will receive their distributions directly in brokerage accounts. Depending on the starting capital that an investor has, the distribution payments could potentially exceed what they could make if they were receiving social security.