Overcrowded Emergency Rooms Impact The Accuracy Of Treatment According To Tallahassee ER Doctor Eric Forsthoefel

Emergency rooms are the front line when it comes to treating patients with health issues. More people go to emergency rooms for treatment than they did in the past for several reasons. The primary reason is emergency rooms treat anyone who comes through the doors. And more than 30 percent of the people who come through the doors are non-urgent patients. That means they don’t stay in the hospital once the ER assesses and treats their health issues. According to some ER doctors, only 50 percent of the people they treat end up staying in the hospital for further treatment. That scenario creates serious overcrowding in hospitals all over the country.

Nine in ten doctors say they shorten or changed medical histories when there is another person close enough to hear what’s going on in an examination room. And more than half of the ER physicians alter how they do examinations when emergency room overcrowding fills all the treatment rooms and the hallways. In fact, patients treated in hallways may only get an abbreviated medical history exam, according to 75 percent of emergency room doctors who took part in a recent survey.

The study also showed ER Doctors change how they examine female patients in overcrowded emergency rooms. Plus, overcrowding hinders some doctors from uncovering social issues like domestic violence, elder abuse, substance abuse, and suicidal thinking, according to Emergency room physician Dr. Eric Forsthoefel. Dr. Forsthoefel is a Tallahassee Florida ER doctor who works in an overcrowded emergency room. He sees the problem that exists when non-urgent care patients flood emergency rooms because they can’t get an appointment with their primary care provider.

Dr. Forsthoefel graduated from Florida State University with a degree in religion. He decided to go to medical school in Louisiana, and he graduated with an American Board of Emergency Medicine certification in Emergency Medicine. Eric did his residency at Louisiana State University. He completed that residency in 2012. For the last six years, Forsthoefel treated cuts, bruises, and flu symptoms in the same treatment rooms where he treats patients with life-threatening injuries and diseases. Dr. Forsthoefel believes non-urgent treatments have an impact on the mental state of doctors, nurses, and hospital staff.

Time and resources intended for acute emergency room situations are being diverted to non-urgent patients and that makes emergency rooms less efficient and less effective, according to Dr. Forsthoefel. Forsthoefel also said it’s hard to maintain proper patient flow. And that means proper care can fall through the cracks in that disrupted patient flow. Other emergency doctors in Florida and in other states say the same thing. Non-urgent patient care impacts emergency room care.

Non-urgent care in emergency rooms causes overcrowding and overcrowding creates tension, misdiagnosis of other health conditions, and abbreviated medical treatments, according to emergency room physicians. And the overcrowding situation in ER’s will get worst due to a lack of primary care physicians and the lack of a solution to the problem, according to most ER doctors.

The Biography of Shafik Sachedina

Shafik Sachedina relocated from the Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania to the UK in the year 1950 in his adolescence. Sachedina is a great philanthropist and an entrepreneur. Sachedina’s mission in life is to change the livelihood of every members of the Ismaili Society in the entire world. In the London University, Sachedina graduated with bachelor’s degree in the dental surgeon. Also, he is a member and advisory of the Institute of Ismaili Studies. The studies promote the Muslim culture while providing the teachings and beliefs of the Ismaili Society to the community followers. Also, the study helps to make the Ismaili Community meaningful to the members.

Shafik Sachedina associates with the Aga Khan Organisation, an institution based in the UK for charity work and Aga Khan Development Network. Sachedina is the primary organizer of the charity missions of the community. Therefore, he dedicates much of his time, resources, and attention to charitable purposes. The philanthropist was the Ismaili Community President on two occasions. After graduating from the London University as a dental surgeon, he assumed various positions in numerous institutions. In collaboration with other healthcare centers, Shafik Sachedina would make sure the patients receive the appropriate medical attention at all time. Sachedina received various honors due to his determination in peacemaking.

For instance, he was the principle organizer of the delegation that would settle the confrontational issues between Afghanistan and Syria. The philanthropist believes that he is not a resident of a specific country, but he is the ambassador of peace and development of the whole world. Shafik Sachedina is the co-founder of Sussex Healthcare center. Under his visionary leadership, the organisation scooped the Investor in People Honor. Sussex Healthcare offers the emotionally comforting environment to the old, who need to live life to the fullest. The facility began in the year 1985. Today, we have over 23 homes across Sussex with more than 500-holding units. Other than taking care of the old, Sussex Healthcare accommodates adults with developing issues like learning disabilities, autism, and brain injuries. At Sussex, we offer chances for the patients to participate in the community activities like gardening.